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Lusty Lady

Watch me talk about my debut as an author, Sex & Cupcakes: A Juicy Collection of Essays, in this Q&A with my publisher Thought Catalog Books

Friday, December 05, 2008

Isn't every straight man obsessed with breats?

I almost wrote, isn't everyone? And obviously I'm joking. I know lots of straight guys who are as far from being boobisexuals as possible. As a girl who's, um, well-endowed, I find that fascinating, though in my personal life, I find it annoying. I'm into having my boobs played with, to put it mildly. I do respect it though. In general we tend to treat straight men as monolithic, all liking the exact same fictionalized all-Pamela Anderson world, all the time, and clearly there is great diversity when it comes to men's sexuality. If you do like breasts, straight man or not, check out the Flickr group Cleavage: The Beautiful Divide.

So I was intrigued by this new 32-page comic book The Man Who Loved Breasts by Robert Goodin, out from Top Shelf.

The Man Who Loved Breasts

from Brian Heater's review at The Daily Cross Hatch:

“The Man Who Loved Breasts” proves a surprisingly touching little story. Less fueled by sexual obsession than the title—and cover—might lead one to suspect, the titular man begins the story in a dead-end job typing promotional news letters for a vacuum and sewing company aimed at “housewives out in the suburbs.”

While the sexual overtones are certainly impossible to ignore, it’s the man’s genuine aesthetic affection for breasts combined with a distaste for his mundane employer that lead him to quit his job, experiment with alcoholism, and ultimately open up his own brassiere manufacturing company—all while pressing forth through a number of graphic montages that gleefully reestablish his—and, arguably, Goodin’s—appreciation for the aforementioned body part. The artist also readily embraces the time period in which the story is set, bringing into play the stodgy uniformity of the 50s and the liberating protests of the 60s, ultimately transcending the prurient nature of the story’s title.

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